lich-tung:

thebeginningofsimplicity:

Enso is a Japanese word meaning “circle” and a concept strongly associated with Zen. Enso is perhaps the the most common subject of Japanese calligraphy, symbolizing no beginning and no end, the visible and the invisible, absolute fullness in emptiness, simplicity, completeness, perfect harmony, enlightenment, the oneness of life, cyclical nature of existence and it is also an “expression of the moment”. It is believed by many that the character of the artist is fully exposed in how he paints Enso, and that only one who is mentally and spiritually whole can paint a true Enso.

//

lich-tung:

thebeginningofsimplicity:

Enso is a Japanese word meaning “circle” and a concept strongly associated with Zen. Enso is perhaps the the most common subject of Japanese calligraphy, symbolizing no beginning and no end, the visible and the invisible, absolute fullness in emptiness, simplicity, completeness, perfect harmony, enlightenment, the oneness of life, cyclical nature of existence and it is also an “expression of the moment”. It is believed by many that the character of the artist is fully exposed in how he paints Enso, and that only one who is mentally and spiritually whole can paint a true Enso.

(via disintangible)


lich-tung:

thebeginningofsimplicity:

Enso is a Japanese word meaning “circle” and a concept strongly associated with Zen. Enso is perhaps the the most common subject of Japanese calligraphy, symbolizing no beginning and no end, the visible and the invisible, absolute fullness in emptiness, simplicity, completeness, perfect harmony, enlightenment, the oneness of life, cyclical nature of existence and it is also an “expression of the moment”. It is believed by many that the character of the artist is fully exposed in how he paints Enso, and that only one who is mentally and spiritually whole can paint a true Enso.

//

lich-tung:

thebeginningofsimplicity:

Enso is a Japanese word meaning “circle” and a concept strongly associated with Zen. Enso is perhaps the the most common subject of Japanese calligraphy, symbolizing no beginning and no end, the visible and the invisible, absolute fullness in emptiness, simplicity, completeness, perfect harmony, enlightenment, the oneness of life, cyclical nature of existence and it is also an “expression of the moment”. It is believed by many that the character of the artist is fully exposed in how he paints Enso, and that only one who is mentally and spiritually whole can paint a true Enso.

(via disintangible)


I cannot discover God in myself and myself in others unless I have the courage to face myself exactly as I am, with all my limitations, and to accept others as they are, with all their limitations. The religious answer is not religion if it is not fully real.
Thomas Merton, quoted in this a radio pilgrimage to L’Arche. (via beingblog)

(via tweety007)


libutron:

Blue-ringed octopus: a beauty to look at but don’t touch
Blue-Ringed octopuses are very small organisms, belonging to the genus Hapalochlaena (Cephalopoda - Octopodidae). They are the size of a golf ball but its venom is powerful enough to kill an adult human in minutes. The bite might be painless, but this octopus secrets a neuromuscular paralyzing venom. 
The venom is not injected but is contained in the octopus’s saliva, which comes from two glands each as big as its brain. The venom contains some maculotoxin, a substance more violent than any found on land animals. This substance blocks the nerve conduction and causes neuromuscular paralysis, followed by death. The venom also contains tetrodotoxin, which blocks sodium channels and causes motor paralysis and occasionally respiratory failure. Though with fixed dilated pupils, the senses of the victims are often intact, they are aware but unable to respond.
There’s no known antidote, but the victim might be saved if artificial respiration starts before marked cyanosis and hypotension develops. The only treatment is hours of heart massage and artificial respiration until the toxin has worked its way out of your system.
Some symptoms that may be experienced when the toxin enters the system are: onset of nausea, hazy vision (within seconds you are blind), loss of sense of touch, speech and the ability to swallow.  
Although the painless bite can kill an adult, injuries have only occurred when an octopus has been picked out of its pool and provoked or stepped on. So be careful in the Australian beaches, and, please, don’t touch this cute octopus.
Blue-Ringed Octopus Bite First Aid: 
1.- This bite is considered a medical emergency so do not wait for symptoms to develop; quickly get the person bitten out of the water and, if possible, call the emergency number and consider transport to the nearest hospital.
2.- Use the pressure immobilization technique: wrap the limb with an elastic bandage. It should be tight, but the fingers and toes should remain pink so that the circulation is not cut off. The extremity should also be immobilized  with a splint or stick of some sort. The elastic bandage should be removed for 90 seconds every 10 minutes and then reapplied for the first 4 to 6 hours (hopefully medical care can be received within this time period). If 30 minutes or more has passed since the blue-octopus bite, the pressure immobilization technique is not likely to be helpful.
3.- If the victim is having difficulty breathing, assist with mouth-to-mouth ventilation. 
When a victim is kept alive the poison gradually wears off after 24h, apparently leaving no side effects.
References: [1] - [2]
Photo credit: ©Bjørn Christian Tørrissen | Locality: Sidney, Australia

libutron:

Blue-ringed octopus: a beauty to look at but don’t touch

Blue-Ringed octopuses are very small organisms, belonging to the genus Hapalochlaena (Cephalopoda - Octopodidae). They are the size of a golf ball but its venom is powerful enough to kill an adult human in minutesThe bite might be painless, but this octopus secrets a neuromuscular paralyzing venom

The venom is not injected but is contained in the octopus’s saliva, which comes from two glands each as big as its brain. The venom contains some maculotoxin, a substance more violent than any found on land animals. This substance blocks the nerve conduction and causes neuromuscular paralysis, followed by death. The venom also contains tetrodotoxin, which blocks sodium channels and causes motor paralysis and occasionally respiratory failure. Though with fixed dilated pupils, the senses of the victims are often intact, they are aware but unable to respond.

There’s no known antidote, but the victim might be saved if artificial respiration starts before marked cyanosis and hypotension develops. The only treatment is hours of heart massage and artificial respiration until the toxin has worked its way out of your system.

Some symptoms that may be experienced when the toxin enters the system are: onset of nausea, hazy vision (within seconds you are blind), loss of sense of touch, speech and the ability to swallow.  

Although the painless bite can kill an adult, injuries have only occurred when an octopus has been picked out of its pool and provoked or stepped on. So be careful in the Australian beaches, and, please, don’t touch this cute octopus.

Blue-Ringed Octopus Bite First Aid: 

1.- This bite is considered a medical emergency so do not wait for symptoms to develop; quickly get the person bitten out of the water and, if possible, call the emergency number and consider transport to the nearest hospital.

2.- Use the pressure immobilization technique: wrap the limb with an elastic bandage. It should be tight, but the fingers and toes should remain pink so that the circulation is not cut off. The extremity should also be immobilized  with a splint or stick of some sort. The elastic bandage should be removed for 90 seconds every 10 minutes and then reapplied for the first 4 to 6 hours (hopefully medical care can be received within this time period). If 30 minutes or more has passed since the blue-octopus bite, the pressure immobilization technique is not likely to be helpful.

3.- If the victim is having difficulty breathing, assist with mouth-to-mouth ventilation. 

When a victim is kept alive the poison gradually wears off after 24h, apparently leaving no side effects.

References: [1] - [2]

Photo credit: ©Bjørn Christian Tørrissen | Locality: Sidney, Australia


The river is within us, the sea is all about us
T. S. Eliot, “The Dry Salvages” (via mitochondria)

영조대왕의 도포 (King Yungjo’s Outer Coat), (1740 9月)

(Source: cnyck, via highwayaisle)



centuriesbehind:

Faroe Islands

centuriesbehind:

Faroe Islands

(Source: holidayspots4u.com, via odinsbane)


(Source: rosaseimagens, via abraxix)


(Source: theescout, via randombeautysls)


Heaven is this moment.
Hell is the burning desire
for this moment to be different.
It’s that simple.
Jeff Foster (via in-a-wonderland-they-lie)

(via tweety007)


Convictions are more dangerous foes of truth than lies.
Friedrich Nietzsche (via penseesduchoeur)

(Source: ephe, via randombeautysls)


destroyed-and-abandoned:

Abandoned locomotive repair depot
Source: lwrs10 (reddit)

destroyed-and-abandoned:

Abandoned locomotive repair depot

Source: lwrs10 (reddit)


(via odinsbane)


mylittleillumination:

Archetype of Wholeness: Jung and the Mandala
  In his writings on mandala symbolism, Carl Jung refers to the mandala as “the psychological expression of the totality of the self.” Within everyone’s psyche, to one degree or another, can be found a seed-center of the self surrounded by a chaotic maelstrom of issues, fears, passions and countless other psychological elements. It is the very disordered state of these elements that creates the discord and emotional imbalances from which too many of us suffer on a regular basis. The mandala is a template for the mind, a state of peace and order, a resolution of the chaos within. In Jung’s words, “The severe pattern imposed by a circular image of this kind compensates the disorder and confusion of the psychic state—namely, through the construction of a central point to which everything is related.”
     This central point is the absolute seat of the self, the anchor for all the extraneous elements of your environment and your psyche. In actuality these two are not separate entities, rather they are intimately combined, inextricably linked. The effects of the world within and the world without are often indistinguishable as far as your self is concerned. Internal elements (ideas, emotions, compulsions) interact freely with external elements (news, relationships, taxes) in the interface that is your mind. Understanding this exchange helps us see more clearly how certain patterns and symbolic elements from our most ancient origins have been internalized and carried through the ages, only to be unconsciously externalized in the beauty of the mandala.
     Ritualistic mandalas from specific cultures display a style and variety of elements with special significance to that culture. There are nearly as many types of mandalas as there have been societies in the history of Humankind. But the essence of the pattern of the mandala, the “squaring of the circle,” is a basic motif in the architecture of so many dreams and fantasies whose unifying similarities stretch across the ages. The quaternary pattern imposed upon the circle symbolizes the application of an orderly architecture upon the infinity of the cosmos. It gives the psyche a safe place on which to stand, a solid foundation upon which it can gather itself to achieve completeness and harmony. Furthermore, the central point, or bindu, is the reference point for the self to identify with. Jung refers to this pattern as the “archetype of wholeness.”
     This ordering effect on the human psyche is not, Jung stresses, the result of conscious reflection or cultural effort. It is a pre-existing condition of consciousness that such patterns help bring it into focus or return to an earlier, more peaceful state. This is why Jung found the mandala to be present in so many cultures and mythologies spanning the globe and the history of Humanity itself. It is an integral part of the collective unconscious that is shared by every person that has ever lived. The mandala is an unconscious state in which all opposites come together and are united, where the polar aspects of the cosmos and the individual can become one. This union of opposites is the very process by which we achieve wholeness, and through which we find peace.
     A great deal of Jung’s psychotherapy dealt with the interpretation of individual mandalas created by his patients. In addition to the soothing, focusing effect he noted as a result in his patients’ psychological states, there was also a great deal of commonality between the images they created. Patients who had no prior knowledge of mandalas or any other conscious symbolistic expression repeatedly put to paper strikingly similar images in the course of their progress. Jung writes of the significance of these similarities:
"In view of the fact that all the mandalas shown here were new and uninfluenced products, we are driven to the conclusion that there must be a transconscious disposition in every individual which is able to produce the same or very similar symbols at all times and in all places. Since this disposition is usually not a conscious possession of the individual I have called it the collective unconscious, and, as the basis of its symbolical products, I postulate the existence of primordial images, the archetypes."
     It is these archetypes, ageless connections between every conscious being, in conjunction with the elemental pattern of the quaternary and the cardinal points, that create the powerful effect the mandala exhibits on the human psyche. It is as if there were a common reference point at which all our seemingly individual consciousnesses are connected, and it is from this realm that the form and effect of the mandala are drawn. The mandala can be considered a blueprint for the essential structure of our existence, and something about this structure is instantly recognized by the unconscious within us. We perceive the shapes, the patterns, the elements within the mandala, we see their relationships to each other, and within that sacred matrix we recognize our self and our place in the cosmos. It is an ancient and fundamental relationship from which we have strayed. The mandala is the key that can help us return to it.
     Jung also equates the mandala with the eye in form as well as spirit, stating that “the eye is the prototype for the mandala.” The eye symbolizes seeing and light, and therefore consciousness itself. The eye is the part of us that beholds the universe and sees our place in it. It is knowledge, awareness and wisdom. The eye takes in light, the pure energy of the universe, and presents it to the inner spirit. It is the gateway, indeed the very union, between the self and the cosmos. As is the mandala. In addition to the structural similarities between the eye and the mandala, the image of the eye is a common element in individual mandalas. Often one can find a repeating pattern of eyes in a mandala. Jung refers to this as polyopthalmia (many-eyed), and considers this a representation of the unconscious as multiple consciousnesses.
     It is evident that the mandala is the link, albeit a mysterious one, between our modern consciousness and our most ancient origins. Jung concluded that “their basic motif is the premonition of a center of personality, a kind of central point within the psyche, to which everything is related, by which everything is arranged, and which is itself a source of energy.” Somewhere in the vast, forgotten reaches of time lies the answer to this wondrous mystery, but also does it lay, quiet and dormant, deep within each one of us. It is for us to rediscover, and to cherish. It is for us to hold this inexhaustible source of energy close to our hearts. Within it we will discover ourselves, we will find each other, and we will reconnect with the essential center of existence.
— Peter Patrick Barreda

mylittleillumination:

Archetype of Wholeness: Jung and the Mandala

  In his writings on mandala symbolism, Carl Jung refers to the mandala as “the psychological expression of the totality of the self.” Within everyone’s psyche, to one degree or another, can be found a seed-center of the self surrounded by a chaotic maelstrom of issues, fears, passions and countless other psychological elements. It is the very disordered state of these elements that creates the discord and emotional imbalances from which too many of us suffer on a regular basis. The mandala is a template for the mind, a state of peace and order, a resolution of the chaos within. In Jung’s words, “The severe pattern imposed by a circular image of this kind compensates the disorder and confusion of the psychic state—namely, through the construction of a central point to which everything is related.”

     This central point is the absolute seat of the self, the anchor for all the extraneous elements of your environment and your psyche. In actuality these two are not separate entities, rather they are intimately combined, inextricably linked. The effects of the world within and the world without are often indistinguishable as far as your self is concerned. Internal elements (ideas, emotions, compulsions) interact freely with external elements (news, relationships, taxes) in the interface that is your mind. Understanding this exchange helps us see more clearly how certain patterns and symbolic elements from our most ancient origins have been internalized and carried through the ages, only to be unconsciously externalized in the beauty of the mandala.

     Ritualistic mandalas from specific cultures display a style and variety of elements with special significance to that culture. There are nearly as many types of mandalas as there have been societies in the history of Humankind. But the essence of the pattern of the mandala, the “squaring of the circle,” is a basic motif in the architecture of so many dreams and fantasies whose unifying similarities stretch across the ages. The quaternary pattern imposed upon the circle symbolizes the application of an orderly architecture upon the infinity of the cosmos. It gives the psyche a safe place on which to stand, a solid foundation upon which it can gather itself to achieve completeness and harmony. Furthermore, the central point, or bindu, is the reference point for the self to identify with. Jung refers to this pattern as the “archetype of wholeness.”

     This ordering effect on the human psyche is not, Jung stresses, the result of conscious reflection or cultural effort. It is a pre-existing condition of consciousness that such patterns help bring it into focus or return to an earlier, more peaceful state. This is why Jung found the mandala to be present in so many cultures and mythologies spanning the globe and the history of Humanity itself. It is an integral part of the collective unconscious that is shared by every person that has ever lived. The mandala is an unconscious state in which all opposites come together and are united, where the polar aspects of the cosmos and the individual can become one. This union of opposites is the very process by which we achieve wholeness, and through which we find peace.

     A great deal of Jung’s psychotherapy dealt with the interpretation of individual mandalas created by his patients. In addition to the soothing, focusing effect he noted as a result in his patients’ psychological states, there was also a great deal of commonality between the images they created. Patients who had no prior knowledge of mandalas or any other conscious symbolistic expression repeatedly put to paper strikingly similar images in the course of their progress. Jung writes of the significance of these similarities:

"In view of the fact that all the mandalas shown here were new and uninfluenced products, we are driven to the conclusion that there must be a transconscious disposition in every individual which is able to produce the same or very similar symbols at all times and in all places. Since this disposition is usually not a conscious possession of the individual I have called it the collective unconscious, and, as the basis of its symbolical products, I postulate the existence of primordial images, the archetypes."

     It is these archetypes, ageless connections between every conscious being, in conjunction with the elemental pattern of the quaternary and the cardinal points, that create the powerful effect the mandala exhibits on the human psyche. It is as if there were a common reference point at which all our seemingly individual consciousnesses are connected, and it is from this realm that the form and effect of the mandala are drawn. The mandala can be considered a blueprint for the essential structure of our existence, and something about this structure is instantly recognized by the unconscious within us. We perceive the shapes, the patterns, the elements within the mandala, we see their relationships to each other, and within that sacred matrix we recognize our self and our place in the cosmos. It is an ancient and fundamental relationship from which we have strayed. The mandala is the key that can help us return to it.

     Jung also equates the mandala with the eye in form as well as spirit, stating that “the eye is the prototype for the mandala.” The eye symbolizes seeing and light, and therefore consciousness itself. The eye is the part of us that beholds the universe and sees our place in it. It is knowledge, awareness and wisdom. The eye takes in light, the pure energy of the universe, and presents it to the inner spirit. It is the gateway, indeed the very union, between the self and the cosmos. As is the mandala. In addition to the structural similarities between the eye and the mandala, the image of the eye is a common element in individual mandalas. Often one can find a repeating pattern of eyes in a mandala. Jung refers to this as polyopthalmia (many-eyed), and considers this a representation of the unconscious as multiple consciousnesses.

     It is evident that the mandala is the link, albeit a mysterious one, between our modern consciousness and our most ancient origins. Jung concluded that “their basic motif is the premonition of a center of personality, a kind of central point within the psyche, to which everything is related, by which everything is arranged, and which is itself a source of energy.” Somewhere in the vast, forgotten reaches of time lies the answer to this wondrous mystery, but also does it lay, quiet and dormant, deep within each one of us. It is for us to rediscover, and to cherish. It is for us to hold this inexhaustible source of energy close to our hearts. Within it we will discover ourselves, we will find each other, and we will reconnect with the essential center of existence.

Peter Patrick Barreda

(Source: mandalazone.com, via 1-plus-1-equals-one)



1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
Powered by Tumblr. mnchrm theme by bustee.